Tuesday, 23 July 2019

Price reduction for copies of post-1857 E&W wills

It's not often genealogists encounter a permanent price reduction!

The cost of a digital copy of post-1857 probate records from England and Wales has been slashed from £10 to £1.50 with immediate effect. The copies can be ordered via the Find A Will online service, which I can vouch for as pretty efficient having used it (and paid full whack, grrrr) only two weeks ago.

You search the Find A Will database by name and year of death, select the record of interest, and pay up. Up to 10 days later (in my case, just 48 hours), a pdf copy of the probate docs and will arrives in your Inbox.

You can find out more about the service at the UK Goverment site, here, or go direct to the search page at Find A Will.

Monday, 22 July 2019

Irish genealogy and history events, 22 July - 4 August

Monday 22 July: NLI Reading Room and Manuscript Room closed all day to facilitate the Library's continuing redevelopment of the premises. Venue: National Library of Ireland, Kildare Street, Dublin 2. All other services/exhibitons/cafe/Genealogy Advisory Service operate as normal.

Tuesday 23 July: Using social media for Irish research, with Laura Mackinson and Ilene Murray. Host: St. Louis Genealogical Society. Venue: Auditorium at St. Louis County Library HQ, 1640 South Lindbergh, St Louis, MO 63131, USA. 7–8:30pm. Members and non-members welcome. Open to members and non-members.

Wednesday 24 July: Rebels, Redcoats and Contested Identities: The Battle of Tara, 1798, with Dr Ciaran McDonnell. Last of this year's Tara Lecture Series. Host: OPW - Office of Public Works. Venue: Hill of Tara Centre, Dunsany, Navan, Co. Meath. Admission is free but limited seating, so arrive early. All Welcome.

Wednesday 24 July: Irish Family History Assistance. Host: Genealogical Society of Victoria. Venue: GSV Library, Level 6, 85 Queen St, Melbourne 3000, Australia. 10am to 4pm. Free for members. $20 non-members. Bookable one-hour appointments with a research consultant. Details.

Thursday 25 July: Book launch: Interned. The Curragh Internment Camps during the War of Independence, by James Durney. Host and venue: Curragh Military Museum, Curragh Camp, Co. Kildare. All welcome. 7:30pm. Lord Edward's Own Re-Enactment Group will be taking part. RSVP to cilldara2016@gmail.com.

Thursday 25 July: The vernacular architecture of Ireland, with Dr Christy Cunniffe. Host: Kilbarron Terryglass Histoorical Society. Venue: Terryglass Hall, Terryglass, Co Tipperary. Following the talk there will be a tasting of Food from our Fields. Admission €5. (Members €2)

Friday 26 July: A Tyrone family in America – Slavery and the Campbell Family in America, with Andy Hahn of the Campbell House Museum in Missouri. Host: Ulster American Folk Park, Omagh, Co Tyrone, BT78 5QU. 1pm. All welcome. Phone 0208 8224 3292 for details.

Saturday 27 July: A Tyrone family in America &nash; Native Americans, Robert Campbell and the presidency of Ullyses Grant, with Andy Hahn of the Campbell House Museum in Missouri. Host: Ulster American Folk Park, Omagh, Co Tyrone, BT78 5QU. 1pm. All welcome. Phone 0208 8224 3292 for details.

Sunday 28 July: Genealogy Day at Cabinteely House. Hosts: Genealogical Society of Ireland and DLR Summer Festival 2019. Short talks, demonstrations and advice for beginners and above. 2-5pm. Cabiteely Park, Co Dublin. No booking required. Details.

Monday 29 July: NLI Reading Room and Manuscript Room closed all day to facilitate the Library's continuing redevelopment of the premises. Venue: National Library of Ireland, Kildare Street, Dublin 2. All other services/exhibitons/cafe/Genealogy Advisory Service operate as normal.

Monday 29 July: Walls Don’t Fall Without Effort – the demise of the medieval town walls of Cashel, with Richard O'Brien. Part of the Within and Without the Walls lecture series. Host: Cashel Heritage Forum. Venue: Parish Centre, Friar Street, Cashel, Co Tipperary. 7:30pm. All welcome. Free.

Wednesday 31 July to Saturday 3 August: The Spirit of Mother Jones Festival. Various venues in Shandon, Cork City. Mixed activities include lectures, film screenings, poetry readings, book launches, performance and music. All events free. Programme.



National Archives of Ireland seeks new Director

The National Archives of Ireland (NAI) is seeking a new Director to manage the day-to-day leadership, strategic development and operational management of the archives.

The NAI premises in Bishop Street, Dublin
This is an exciting and challenging time for the NAI as the repository is currently undergoing a major redevelopment of new purpose-built storage facilities at its premises in Bishop Street, Dublin 8. The new Director will have a significant role in managing these developments and implementing future plans which will see the development of education and outreach facilities.

Other responsibilities for the new Director will be in leading, developing and overseeing policy formulation and implementation in the modern information and digital age. The NAI launched a new website earlier this year, and provides free public access to genealogical collections and makes regular contributions to the Decade of Centenaries project.

The new Director will be required to lead the NAI as it continues the preservation and digitisation of its National Collections and makes them available to the public.

The position of Director will be for a five-year fixed term contract and will be filled through an open competition. You'll find further information on the role and details of how to apply on PublicJobs.ie .

Closing date is Thursday 8 August.

Sunday, 21 July 2019

Arizona to host Int'l Famine Commemoration 2019

Josepha Madigan T.D., Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht and Chair of the National Famine Commemoration Committee, has announced that the 2019 International Commemoration of the Great Irish Famine will take place in Phoenix, Arizona on Sunday 3 November.

http://www.artisticsandblasting.com/Stone.htm
The Famine Memorial at the Irish Cultural
Center, Phoenix, Arizona
Confirming the arrangements for this year’s international Commemoration Minister Madigan commented: "As Chair of the National Famine Commemoration Committee, I look forward to the International Famine Commemoration being held in Phoenix, Arizona. This is the fifth time the commemoration has been held in the USA, and Phoenix is the westernmost venue to date. Previously the International Famine Commemoration has been held in New York, Boston, New Orleans and Philadelphia.

"I am particularly pleased that the Commemoration is being held in Phoenix this year as 2019 marks the 20th anniversary of the dedication of the Great Hunger Memorial commissioned by the Irish Cultural Center.

This year’s commemoration represents an opportunity to not only recognise the work of the Irish Cultural Center and McClelland Library in Phoenix but to honour the memory of those who left Ireland during the Famine itself, the subsequent years of emigration which saw many Famine Irish and their descendants make an enormous contribution in the Western states, and the ongoing role of the Irish diaspora and Irish-Americans in Arizona and throughout the Western United States.”

There have been ten international commemorations of the Great Irish Famine to date. Since the first international commemoration in Toronto and Quebec in 2009, events have also been held in Australia, Canada and the UK.

A giant leap for mankind and a half price offer from Irish Newspaper Archives

https://www.irishnewsarchive.com/subscribe?cur=EUR
Half price offer expires tonight
To mark the 50th anniversary of the first Moon Landing, Irish Newspaper Archives is offering a generous 50% off subscriptions to its database. The archive holds more than six million pages of newspaper content from titles published across the island. Many of the newspapers are available from thier very first edition to the current day.

If you want to take advantage of this special offer, you'll need to be quick. Click the image, right, choose your preferred subscription and currency, and, when you get to the payment page, type in the coupon/promo code Moon50 to see the half price sum.

The offer expires tonight, Sunday 21 July, at 11:59pm.


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Friday, 19 July 2019

30 Irish cultural traditions given official recognition

Some 30 unique traditions have been given official recognition by the state. Some of the customs and traditions have a national reach, which others are specific to regions or cities.

Traditional Currachs are still a common sight in
the coastal waters along the West of Ireland.
Among them are the making of Irish crochet lace and Mountmellick embroidery, the Burren Winterage festival, which celebrates the unique farming history of North Clare, the Mummers of Fingal, dry stone construction, which is still such a feature of rural Ireland, Sea currach making and Snap net fishing, and the tradition of carillon – bellringing percussion organ – in Cobh, Co Cork. All 30 have been given a status that will help to protect and preserve the traditions for generations.

The customs have been added to the National Inventory of Ireland’s Intangible Cultural Heritage, a UNESCO initiative to safeguard cultural heritage.

Uileann piping and hurling have already been been inscribed in the UNESCO list of intangible cultural heritage, while an application for harping will be considered at the end of the year.

The full list of customs and traditions recognised on the list are:

  • Uileann Piping
  • Hurling
  • Cruitireacht na hÉireann / Irish Harping
  • Winterage in the Burren
  • Limerick Lace
  • Turas Cholm Cille
  • Snap Net Fishing
  • Irish Crochet Lace
  • Cobh Carillon Playing
  • Native Irish Pedigree Dog Breeds
  • Art and Practice of Falconry
  • St Moling’s Pilgrim’s Route
  • Mountmellick Embroidery
  • Cant / Gamon, the traditional language spoken by Travellers
  • Traveller Tinsmithing
  • Sea Currach Making
  • Mummers of Fingal
  • Basketmaking
  • Letterpress Printing in Ireland
  • Floating Heritage
  • Carrickmacross Lack Making
  • Marcanna na Talaimh
  • Dry Stone Construction
  • Irish Traditional Music
  • Traditional Farming and Sheepdog Training
  • Irish Draught Horse Breeding
  • Boyne Currach Making
  • Loy Digging
  • Holy Wells in County Clare
  • Mid Kerry Biddy

Free access to Ancestry.ca's Canadian census collection

https://prf.hn/click/camref:1101l4phT/creativeref:1011l28222
Ancestry.ca is offering free access to its Canadian Census Collection this weekend.

You can access these records sets (details below) so long as you have a free registered account. If you don't already have one, you'll need to register. This is a straightforward and quick process.

Either way, just click the image to get started.

The free access will end on Sunday 21 July at 11:59pm ET.

The following data collections are included in the free access weekend:

  • 1825 Census of Lower Canada
  • 1842 Census of Canada East
  • 1851 Census of Canada East, Canada West, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia
  • 1861 Census of Canada
  • 1871 Census of Canada
  • 1881 Census of Canada
  • 1891 Census of Canada
  • 1901 Census of Canada
  • 1906 Canada Census of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta
  • 1911 Census of Canada
  • 1916 Canada Census of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta
  • 1921 Census of Canada
  • Nova Scotia, 1770 Census
  • Nova Scotia, Canada, Census, Assessment & Poll Tax Records, 1770-95, 1827, 1838



The content above contains affiliate links. This means I may earn a small commission if you buy via these links. This does not affect the price you pay as a consumer, but it does contribute to keeping IrishGenealogyNews online. See Advertising Disclosure tab above.

Heritage Week 2019 programme launched: 2,000 events

National Heritage Week, which will take place 17–25 August, was officially launched yesterday by Josepha Madigan TD, Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht. The nine-day event is part of European Heritage Days, a joint initiative of the Council of Europe and the EU to promote awareness and involvement in our natural, built and cultural heritage.

Josepha Madigan, TD, with children at
the Heritage Week launch
It is Ireland's most popular cultural event and at least half a million people are expected to participate in some 2,000 heritage events. Nearly all events are free and this year's theme is Pastimes | Past Times.

For family historians, whether they live in Ireland or will be visiting during August, Heritage Week will present a diverse programme of walks, workshops, talks, re-enactments and have-a-go events that can help you understand more about the lives of your ancestors and find out how and where you can discover more. Free genealogy advice, tours of national and local repositories, Open Days at historical venues, 'Living' history experiences, graveyard tours... they are all featured in the line-up. Really, if you can't find at least a handful of events to interest and motivate you, you should check for a pulse.

Search the HeritageWeek.ie database of events using keywords such as Genealogy, Archives, Family history, Ancestors etc.

As the launch was held in Dublin's Henrietta Street, I'm going to call out just one venue for its events likely to be of interest to genealogists: the Registry of Deeds. Not only will it be running lunchtime tours of its very special archive (Monday to Friday, 19-23 August, Booking essential), it will also present an evening seminar exploring some of the recent discoveries made in its collection (Eureka! 22 August, 6-7:30pm. Booking essential.)





Thursday, 18 July 2019

Irish Registry of Deeds Index Project: mid-July update

The Irish Registry of Deeds Index Project has updated its online database with another tranche of transcriptions from its hard-working band of volunteers.

The update means there are now 318,287 records in the main index, transcribed from 34,628 memorials of deeds in the main index.

Additionally, the Townland and Grantors indexes have been updated with new entries. The new totals for each of those indexes are as show in the images, above.

All the indexes can be searched here, free of charge.





Tuesday, 16 July 2019

UCD Digital Library releases Workhouse Drawings

University College Dublin's Digital Library has released a representative sample of drawings, plans and other documents from the Workhouse Collection (ref 85/128) held by the Irish Archictural Archive (IAA).

http://digital.ucd.ie/view/ucdlib:260452
Click map to view UCD Digital Library's
Workhouse Drawings Collection
Built between 1839 and 1847, some 130 workhouses were built. They were designed by architect George Wilkinson to accommodate either 400 people or 800 people and were constructed to a standard specification and layout. Fever Hospitals were added to them from 1847, and 30 more workhouses were built between 1849 and 1853 to a different design. (Of these 163 workhouses, 74 have been completely demolished and seven are derelict.)

While the IAA's Workhouse Collection holds drawings for 81 workhouses in the Republic of Ireland, many are in too delicate a condition for open access but UCD's smaller digital sample collection will allow free and unrestricted access to researchers. It holds 42 drawings and documents relating to the Mallow, Castleblayney, Lismore and Gorey workhouses, and the 104-page Fifth Annual Report of the Poor Law Commissioners dating from 1839.

Accompanying the Workhouse Drawings (digital) Collection is an interactive map showing the location of the workhouses on modern maps and data on whether each survives and, if it does, in what capacity. There is also a very informative short feature about the collection here, which is worth reading for greater insight into these architectural icons that were so feared by our ancestors.

Early July update: Ireland Genealogy Projects Archives

http://www.igp-web.com/IGPArchives/ire/roscommon/photos/tombstones/roscommon-shankill/target3.html
Photo from Shankill cemetery.
Courtesy Dave Hall and IGP Archives.
Volunteers have donated the files noted below to Ireland Genealogy Projects Archives (IGP-web) during the first half of July.

They are made available to researchers, free of charge, but do bear in mind that contributors retain copyright of their transcriptions and/or photographs.

DUBLIN Genealogy Archives – Headstones
Mount Jerome, Dublin - Part 226-229

LONGFORD Genealogy Archives – Land
Registry of Deeds - Index of Grantees, 1708-1738
Registry of Deeds - Index of Grantors, 1708-1738

ROSCOMMON Genealogy Archives – Headstones
Shankill Cemetery, near Elphin (UPDATE)

TIPPERARY Genealogy Archives – Church
Thurles Parish Marriages, Dio. of Cashel & Emly (R.C.) 1841-1843




Monday, 15 July 2019

What's in store from RootsIreland.ie later in the year?

More Roman Catholic records from County Wexford are in the process of being transcribed and will be uploaded to RootsIreland later this year. So, too will another instalment of records for Limerick.

http://www.rootsireland.ie/2019/07/new-issue-of-irish-genealogy-matters-newsletter-just-published/These are two revelations made in the latest Irish Genealogy Matters, the newsletter of the Irish Family History Foundation, which manages the RootsIreland database and oversees an island-wide network of heritage and genealogy centres.

The newsletter also provides an impressive summary of the records uploaded to the database so far this year. They tot up to more than 100,000 records of different types – a selection of Protestant and Roman Catholic baptisms, marriages and burials; confirmations; census substitutes; and civil births, marriages and deaths – and come from Counties Waterford, Armagh, Cork, Wexford, Galway, Laois and Offaly. The transcribing teams have certainly been busy!

All of these records have, of course, been noted here on Irish Genealogy News as and when they were released, but it's worth checking the summary in case you missed a relevant blogpost.

You'll also be able to find news of developments past, present and future, of developments from around the IFHF centres in the newsletter. Click the image to download the pdf.

Irish genealogy, history and heritage events, 15-28 July

Monday 15 July: NLI Main Reading Room and Manuscript Room closed all day to facilitate the Library's continuing redevelopment of the premises. Venue: National Library of Ireland, Kildare Street, Dublin 2. All other services/exhibitons/cafe/Genealogy Advisory Service operate as normal.

Monday 15 July: Bank Holiday in Northern Ireland. PRONI, private libraries and all public lending libraries across Northern Ireland will be closed until Tuesday 16 July. This public holiday does not apply in the Republic of Ireland.

Tuesday 16 July: The Myth Business: Alma and Jeremiah Curtin in Dingle and Ventry, 1892, with Professor Angela Bourke. Host: Dingle Historical Society. Venue: Dingle Skellig Hotel, Dingle, Co Kerry. 8pm. All welcome.

Wednesday 17 July: Tara: 'The Resuscitated Jerusalem', with Dr Mairead Carew. Third of this year's Tara Lecture Series. Host: Office of Public Works. Venue: Hill of Tara Centre, Castleboy, Co Meath. Free. All welcome. Seating limited so arrive early to ensure you get a seat.

Thursday 18 July: Irish Wills in the Society of Genealogists Library, with Else Churchill. Host and venue: Society of Genealogists, 14 Charterhouse Buildings, Gosport Road, London EC1, UK. 1 hour. Free. Bookings.

Friday 19 July: The heritage, archaeology, and folklore of some sacred wells in East Galway, with Christy Cunniffe. Host and venue: Aughrim Visitor Centre, Aughrim, nr Ballinasloe, Co Galway. 2pm. Free. All welcome.

Saturday 20 July: Dead famous – Who is buried where in Northern Ireland, with David Hume. Host: Whitehead Summer Festival and Whitehead Library. Venue: Whitehead Library, Edward Rd, Whitehead, Co Antrim BT38 9QB. Booking essential T 028 9335 3249 / whitehead.library@librariesni.org.uk. Free. All welcome.

Saturday 20 July: A celebration of People, Place and Heritage, an afternoon conference. Part of the Crinniú festival. Host and venue: Irish Workhouse Centre, Portumna, co Galway. 1-4pm. Free. Details.

Saturday 20 July: HER story in history - Irish Women who made a difference, with Maura Barrett. Ormond Castle Lecture Series. Host and venue: Tipperary Studies, County Library, Castle Ave, Thurles Townparks, Thurles, Co. Tipperary. 11:30am. Free. All Welcome. Booking essential on 051 640787.

Saturday 20 July: Lesbian Lives in 1916 and the Irish revolutionary period, with Claire Hackett. Host and venue: Áras Uí Chonghaile, James Connolly Visitor Centre, 374 Falls Rd, Belfast BT12 6DG. 1–2pm. Free. No booking required.

Monday 22 July: NLI Reading Room and Manuscript Room closed all day to facilitate the Library's continuing redevelopment of the premises. Venue: National Library of Ireland, Kildare Street, Dublin 2. All other services/exhibitons/cafe/Genealogy Advisory Service operate as normal.

Tuesday 23 July: Using social media for Irish research, with Laura Mackinson and Ilene Murray. Host: St. Louis Genealogical Society. Venue: Auditorium at St. Louis County Library HQ, 1640 South Lindbergh, St Louis, MO 63131, USA. 7–8:30pm. Members and non-members welcome. Open to members and non-members.

Wednesday 24 July: Rebels, Redcoats and Contested Identities: The Battle of Tara, 1798, with Dr Ciaran McDonnell. Last of this year's Tara Lecture Series. Host: OPW - Office of Public Works. Venue: Hill of Tara Centre, Dunsany, Navan, Co. Meath. Admission is free but limited seating, so arrive early. All Welcome.

Wednesday 24 July: Irish Family History Assistance. Host: Genealogical Society of Victoria. Venue: GSV Library, Level 6, 85 Queen St, Melbourne 3000, Australia. 10am to 4pm. Free for members. $20 non-members. Bookable one-hour appointments with a research consultant. Details.

Thursday 25 July: Book launch: Interned. The Curragh Internment Camps during the War of Independence, by James Durney. Host and venue: Curragh Military Museum, Curragh Camp, Co. Kildare. All welcome. 7:30pm. Lord Edward's Own Re-Enactment Group will be taking part. RSVP to cilldara2016@gmail.com.

Sunday 28 July: Genealogy Day at Cabinteely House. Hosts: Genealogical Society of Ireland and DLR Summer Festival 2019. Short talks, demonstrations and advice for beginners and above. 2-5pm. Cabiteely Park, Co Dublin. No booking required. Details.

Friday, 12 July 2019

FindMyPast's growing US passenger and crew collection tops 102m records

FindMyPast has consolidated its collection of US passenger and crew records and added a further two million records covering Boston, Texas and South Carolina.

Click image to view expanded sample manifest
This growing collection now holds more than 102.5million records, most of them from the National Archives and Record Admission (NARA) in Washington, John F Kennedy Trust Ltd, and Mystic Seaport Museums. You'll find a full list of the lists and their sources here.

Spanning 1800-1965, the collection includes ship manifests kept by shipmasters, crew lists, flight manifests, passenger arrival lists, and more, and documents the arrival of millions of immigrants – so many of them Irish – into America.

Transcripts and images are available for most of the entries, and many researchers will discover not only basic details of their ancestor's year and place of birth, arrival and place of arrival and ship name, but also who their ancestor travelled with, what their occupation was, their last residence and who they were intending to visit after arrival.

The crew lists may reveal physical descriptions, lengths of service, literacy levels and specific jobs of individuals working on a ship.



The content above contains affiliate links. This means I may earn a small commission if you buy via these links. This does not affect the price you pay as a consumer, but it does contribute to keeping IrishGenealogyNews online. See Advertising Disclosure tab above.

Thursday, 11 July 2019

New book: Marriage and the Irish - a miscellany

https://wordwellbooks.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=1887
Click cover image for publisher's online shop
Marriage and the Irish: a miscellany is the second in the Wordwell series Birth, Marriage and Death among the Irish.

Like the successful first book of the series – Death and the Irish: a Miscellany – the marriage volume has been edited by Salvador Ryan, Professor of Ecclesiastical History at St Patrick's College, Maynooth.

The 283-page paperback explores the institution of marriage in Ireland over 1,400 years, beginning with the concept of marriage in early Irish law and ending with a mainly statistical snapshot of marriage in 2016. It holds 79 articles written by 75 contributors from a range of academic disciplines.

As a collection, the book tells the story of how attitudes and practices related to marriage have evolved over the years in response to social changes, religious tenets, legal developments and shifting life expectations.

All of the features are short; most are less than 1,200 words in length and all are accompanied by suggestions for further reading and/or details of the writer's main sources.

The range of topics is vast. Here's a selection: the secrets of the medieval Irish bed; C16th court cases concerning impotence, drunkenness and dowries; domestic violence in early modern Ireland; clandestine marriages; mixed marriages; elopement; the introduction of marriage equality, the C19th honeymoon; desertion and divorce; and humanist ceremonies. There are also articles focussed on specific groups of people eg Irish emigrants; Methodists; Quakers; aristocrats; and Travellers.

With the individual articles being so short and the topics so varied, this is an easy book to pick up for a quick, morsel-sized bite at the subject and its place in our ancestors' lives and, indeed, in our own.

The neatly-presented illustrated book is available from the County Dublin-based publishers, Wordwell Ltd, price €25.

ISBN978-1-9164922-2-6

Wednesday, 10 July 2019

Future Irish census will carry messages from the past

For the first time, the 2021 census of the Republic of Ireland will allow people to write a confidential or personal message on their census questionnaire; this message – dubbed a 'time-capsule' feature, will be offered with neither guidance nor restrictions on what individuals might wish to convey to their descendants or future society, and will remain sealed for 100 years. Leaving a message will be voluntary.

Other changes to the quesionnaire will see eight new questions posed. They focus on renewable energy sources, smoking, volunteering, childcare, commuting home from work, school or college, internet access and devices, smoke alarms and working from home. Some 25 existing questions, including those dealing with disability, ethnic group, Irish language and religion, will be updated.

The next census will be paper-based and take place on Sunday 18 April 2021. The changes follow the Central Statistics Office's two-year public consultation and pilot survey, the latter having been carried out in September 2018 in 35 areas in seven counties, with 10,000 households taking part.

Commenting on the consultation and Pilot Survey, Cormac Halpin, Senior Statistician, said: "The value of the statistical information provided by the census cannot be overestimated. It drives policy, targets services where needed and informs our decisions at a time of continuing social change. "There is an international element to the next census as every other EU member state will also be required to carry out a census in 2021."

Time for some debate, perhaps, on what our descendants might want to learn about us in 2121?

Monday, 8 July 2019

Irish Genealogy, History and Heritage events, 8-21 July

Monday 8 July: NLI Reading Room and Manuscript Room closed all day to facilitate the Library's continuing redevelopment of the premises. Venue: National Library of Ireland, Kildare Street, Dublin 2. All other services/exhibitons/cafe, including Genealogy Advisory Service, operate as normal.

Monday 8 July: Irish Genealogy: Life in the Past Lane, with Barbara Griffin. Host: IFCI. Venue: Friendly Sons of The Shillelagh, 815 16th Ave, Belmar, New Jersey, USA. Free to IACI members. Guests $10. All welcome. Details and booking.

Tuesday 9 July: Headstones – their obvious and hidden messages, with John Nangle. Host: GSI. Venue: DFEi, Cumberland St, Dun Laoghaire, Co Dublin. 8pm. All welcome. €3.

Wednesday 10 July: Tara and the Celtic Revival, with Professor Emeritus Muiris O Sullivan. Tara Lecture Series. Host and venue: Hill of Tara Centre, Dunsany, Navan, Co. Meath. Free. Seating limited (arrive early). All welcome.

Thursday 11 July: Traditional boats of Ireland – Dónal Mac Pólin Collection, exhibition launch. Part of the Earagail Arts Festival. Host: Donegal County Museum, High Road, Letterkenny, Co Donegal. 7pm Free. RSVP to museum@donegalcoco.ie.

Friday 12 July: Bank Holiday (also Monday 15 July) in Northern Ireland. PRONI, private libraries and all public lending libraries across Northern Ireland will be closed until Tuesday 16 July. These public holidays do not apply in the Republic of Ireland.

Saturday 13 July: Afternoon Tea celebrating Lady Catherine Beresford, nee Power, hosted by Curraghmore House, Portlaw, Co. Waterford as part of the Comeraghs Wild Festival. Two talks, plus a traditional afternoon tea in the formal dining room and a visit to the Shellhouse. Talks: Commemorating Lady Catherine, 1701-1769, with Julian Walton, and Laid out in Fine Taste: Lady Catherine Power & Sir Marcus Beresford's creations at Tyrone House and Curraghmore, with William Fraher. 3pm. Due to limited numbers, places must be booked. Admission: €50. Details.

Sunday 14 July: The Waterford country house during the revolutionary period, with William Fraher. Part of the Comeraghs Wild Festival. Venue: Woodhouse Estate, Stradbally, Co Waterford. 2pm. Admission: €25, includes afternoon tea. Bookings.

Monday 15 July: NLI Reading Room and Manuscript Room closed all day to facilitate the Library's continuing redevelopment of the premises. Venue: National Library of Ireland, Kildare Street, Dublin 2. All other services/exhibitons/cafe, including Genealogy Advisory Service, operate as normal.

Monday 15 July: Bank Holiday in Northern Ireland. PRONI, private libraries and all public lending libraries across Northern Ireland will be closed until Tuesday 16 July. This public holiday does not apply in the Republic of Ireland.

Tuesday 16 July: The Myth Business: Alma and Jeremiah Curtin in Dingle and Ventry, 1892, with Professor Angela Bourke. Host: Dingle Historical Society. Venue: Dingle Skellig Hotel, Dingle, Co Kerry. 8pm. All welcome.

Wednesday 17 July: Tara: 'The Resuscitated Jerusalem', with Dr Mairead Carew. Third of this year's Tara Lecture Series. Host: Office of Public Works. Venue: Hill of Tara Centre, Castleboy, Co Meath. Free. All welcome. Seating limited so arrive early to ensure you get a seat.

Thursday 18 July: Irish Wills in the Society of Genealogists Library, with Else Churchill. Host and venue: Society of Genealogists, 14 Charterhouse Buildings, Gosport Road, London EC1, UK. 1 hour. Free. Bookings.

Saturday 20 July: Dead famous – Who is buried where in Northern Ireland, with David Hume. Host: Whitehead Summer Festival and Whitehead Library. Venue: Whitehead Library, Edward Rd, Whitehead, Co Antrim BT38 9QB. Booking essential T 028 9335 3249 / whitehead.library@librariesni.org.uk. Free. All welcome.

Friday, 5 July 2019

AncestryUK: Free access weekend to UK military records

This weekend, Ancestry UK is giving free access to all its UK military records. (As far as I'm aware, free access isn't available via other Ancestry territories.)

Within this collection is a wide range of record sets. Here's a small sample of them: 
https://prf.hn/click/camref:1100l4pTC/destination:https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ancestry.co.uk
Free access period has ended
  • Canada, Pension Applications For Widows and Family of British Military Officers, 1776-1881
  • Royal Hospital Chelsea Pensioner Soldier Service Records, 1760-1920
  • Scottish Soldiers in Colonial America
  • Ireland, Royal Irish Constabulary Pensions, 1873-1925
  • American Loyalist Claims, 1776-1835

See the full list of featured record sets here.

If you have already registered with Ancestry, click the image and start searching. If you don't already have a regsitered account, you'll need to register with your name and email address; you'll then be sent a username and password to access the records.

The free access weekend will end on Sunday 7 July at 11:59pm GMT.




The content above contains affiliate links. This means I may earn a small commission if you buy via these links. This does not affect the price you pay as a consumer, but it does contribute to keeping IrishGenealogyNews online. See Advertising Disclosure tab above.

Enrolment open for University of Limerick's MA History of Family

Enrolment is now open for this September's intake for the MA History of Family at the University of Limerick.

While it is not a genealogy course, the subject may appeal to anyone with an interest in Irish history and family history who wants to take their research a stage further and study towards a Master's degree.

Students study the family within its broader context of social, cultural and economic history, and a wide range of topics are covered, including families and migration, families and communities and Irish cultural history, as well as academic writing and advanced research skills. Students also write a dissertation based on their own research.

Course Director Dr Ciara Breathnach explains that the course appeals to a diverse range of students. "Some join the course straight after finishing their undergraduate degree, but several have joined following a long break from formal study. They have often developed an interest in Irish history through researching their own families and may have done a few courses in genealogy. They now feel ready to take this study further, in a more academic environment. The programme is designed to appeal to those wishing to upskill, reskill or conduct continuing professional development. and is sensitive to busy lives and those working full-time."

The course is delivered both on-campus and online. Online students interact with colleagues in Ireland via audio-conference and through the University of Limerick’s virtual learning environment. The result is that the students are as diverse as the topics. "Students are based not just in Ireland but also from all over the diaspora including America, Australia, Canada and the UK," says Dr Rachel Murphy. "This provides a really enriching environment in which to teach and learn, as students share their wide range of experiences."

The course may be studied full-time (one year) or part-time (two years).

For more details, visit the course homepages:

Thursday, 4 July 2019

Richmond Barracks' Mondays at the Mess podcasts

The Mess cafe at Richmond Barracks,
off Buffin Road, Inchicore, Dublin 8.
Looking for some more podcasts to extend your knowledge of Irish political, social and cultural history? Dublin's Richmond Barracks, which opened as a museum, exhibition and cultural centre three years ago, has been hosting a popular monthly lecture series called Mondays at the Mess. The lectures are presented by historians, authors and archivists, with wide-ranging historical themes covering national and Dublin issues and events.

While there's a €5 admission fee to attend the talks in person, all visitors are treated to tea and a scone.

For those unable to attend, more than 20 of the talks can now be enjoyed online, free. No tea and scone, but there's nothing to stop you putting on the kettle and grabbing a jammie dodger from the biscuit jar.

The following selection of lecture titles should give you a taste of what's on offer:

Momento mori : Post-mortem photography and child mortality in early 20th century Dublin, with Orla Fitzpatrick

Independence and Dependants – The Military Service (1916-1923) Pensions Collection, with Robert McEvoy

Gala Days – Executions in Late Medieval Dublin, Dr Áine Foley

The Beautiful Game in Dublin: Early Days and Glories, with Donal Fallon

The Devout and the Deviant (issues around the 1935 Criminal Law Amendment Act which dealt with sexual crime and sexual activity), with Molly O’Duffy

Grave Matters – Death and Dying in Dublin from 1500 to the present, with Lisa Marie Griffith

Votes for Women: Suffrage in the Suburbs, with Maeve Casserly

Here's the link to view the Mondays at the Mess podcasts menu.

Wednesday, 3 July 2019

4th of July Flash Sale: Half price Ancestry subscriptions

Ancestry is running a 4th of July Flash Sale in the US (only) on Ancestry memberships subscriptions. They're half price! You'll have to be quick. The discounts will disappear tomorrow night. Here's what's on offer:

https://prf.hn/click/camref:1011l4pku/destination:https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ancestry.com
Offer has expired
US Discovery
Access to all US records (50% off).
6-month subscription reduced from $99 to $49 (save $50). 1-month subscription also half price.

World Explorer
Access all US and international records.
6-month subscription reduced from $149 to $74 (save 75). 1-month subscription also half price.

All AccessAccess to all US and International records, Fold 3 and Newspapers.com Basic.
6-month sub reduced from $199 to $99 (save $100). 1-month subscription also half price.

These membership offers are available to new subscribers only and are not for renewal of current subscriptions. You need to purchase your new package before 11.59pm PST on Thursday 4 July.

Click the image for more details and to place your order.



The content above contains affiliate links. This means I may earn a small commission if you buy via these links. This does not affect the price you pay as a consumer, but it does contribute to keeping IrishGenealogyNews online. See Advertising Disclosure tab above.



Ireland's Registry of Deeds: a step closer to digitisation

Henrietta Street approach to the Registry of Deeds,
where the Digitisation Strategy Steering Group
held its first meeting last week.
Maybe I haven't had my nose close enough to the grindstone of late, but this ENORMOUS news landed in front of me last night without a whisper of prior warning: the Property Registration Authority (PRA) hosted the first meeting of the Registry of Deeds Digitisation Strategy Steering Group (RDDSS) last week.

Yep. Online accessibility to this huge and unique collection of more than five million memorial records – property transactions, marriage settlements, wills and the like – dating from 1708 may now be rather less of a genealogists' pipe dream than we thought. Those of us grown old on 'it won't happen in my lifetime' negativity had better revisit their future plans, as the PRA has set out a vision to make the Registry of Deeds' records 'available and discoverable online for research and the enjoyment of all'.

The RDDSS Group brought together a good number of PRA staff, representatives of government departments, archival and educational institutions, professional bodies and key user groups from across the island. Among them was John Grenham MAGI, who knows a thing or two about genealogists' needs and database realities!

Realism is, of course, going to be required in equal measure to patience by family historians, because is won't be a quick and easy digitisation project, up and running in a matter of months. There are preservation issues, there are several different categories of records, there are physical challenges with the 17,000 large and cumbersome bound volumes, and inevitably, the ugly necessity of identifying funding and collaborative partners. The RDDSS Group is exploring strategy, and the project has a long way to go before it moves on from the talking phase, but the digitisation of this important archive of material does seem to have come one giant step closer.

For more info and pix of the RDDSS Group members, see the PRA news story.

* In the meantime, Irish genealogists shouldn't forget the Registry of Deeds Index Project, a volunteer-led project now holding more than 317,000 entries in its free online database. It's updated on a monthly basis. You might be lucky and find a memorial of Deeds relating to your ancestor long before the digitised deeds collection makes its way to our screens.

Tuesday, 2 July 2019

MilitaryArchives.ie begins consolidation and upgrade

The team at Ireland's Military Archives in Dublin has advised that the content of its dedicated Bureau of Military History website has been amalgamated into the parent MilitaryArchives.ie site from today. In the course of time (domain expiry) the dedicated site will be withdrawn.

The Military Archives, Cathal Brugha Barracks,
Rathmines, Dublin 6
While an automatic 'redirect' has been set up, you may as well take a moment or two to point your existing 'Favourites' or 'Bookmarks' towards the new url, which is:

http://www.militaryarchives.ie/en/collections/online-collections/bureau-of-military-history-1913-1921.

This transfer of the Bureau of Military History site's digital resources to the parent site is the first stage of a planned website upgrade. Further consolidation of MilitaryArchives.ie will follow, as will improvements in site functionality.

You can find out more at MilitaryArchives.ie.

Ireland Genealogy Projects Archives: June's updates

The volunteer team at Ireland Genealogy Projects Archives, part of IGP-web, uploaded the following files to the free database during June:

Headstone to Nicholas and Mary McLeady and
their son Maitiu (Matt) O'Maoileidigh in
Mount Jerome Cemetery, Dublin. Click to enlarge.
Photo courtesy of IGP Archives and Yvonne Russell.

CAVAN Genealogy Archives - Headstones
Ballyconnell, Our Lady of Lourdes (R.C.) Graveyard
Mullahoran, Our Lady of Lourdes (R.C.) (partial)

CORK Genealogy Archives - Headstones
Castletownroche, Bridgetown Priory Graveyard
St Edmund's, CoI, Coolkelure (near Dunmanway)

DONEGAL Genealogy Archives - Headstones
Raphoe, Presbyterian Church

DUBLIN Genealogy Archives - Headstones
Mount Jerome, Dublin - Part 223-225

TIPPERARY Genealogy Archives - Church Records
Thurles Parish Marriages, Dio. of Cashel & Emly (R.C.) 1838-1840

Monday, 1 July 2019

Grab a 20% discount on an annual sub to RootsIreland

RootsIreland is offering a 20% discount on all new 12-month subscriptions taken out on or before midnight (Irish Summer Time) Sunday 14 July.

http://www.rootsireland.ie/That's a pretty generous offer from the online database that holds more than 23 million records, including the most complete and accurate set of Roman Catholic church records online, and civil birth, marriage and death records for more than half the island's counties.

The database is regularly updated, too; in the first half of 2019, some 100,000 transcription have been added from counties Armagh, Laois, Offaly, Waterford and Wexford, and from East Galway.

You can find a menu of the online records available for each county here.

RootsIreland.ie is run by the Irish Family History Foundation, a not-for-profit organisation which manages 34 genealogy centres across the island. The genealogists working in these centres have an unparalleled amount of local knowledge which can be invaluable to those tracing their ancestors, a service which no other website or company can provide to such a high standard. By taking out a subscription with RootsIreland, you are helping these centres to continue to provide a world-class service and securing many Irish jobs.

Both existing and new customers can take advantage of this special summer discount. New customers should click the logo and register for an account.

If you are a returning customer or you currently have a subscription, click the logo, click My Account, My Subscription and Start a New Subscription. The special deal subscription will begin once your current subscription (if any) runs out.

Irish genealogy, heritage and history events, 1-14 July

All of July: C4, the Research Centre of the NIFHS, is closed throughout the month, reopening 4 August. Venue: Unit C4, Valley Business Centre, 67 Church Road, Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, BT36 7LS.

Monday 1 July: NLI Reading Room and Manuscript Room closed all day to facilitate the Library's continuing redevelopment of the premises. Venue: National Library of Ireland, Kildare Street, Dublin 2. All other services/exhibitons/cafe, including Genealogy Advisory Service, operate as normal.

Monday 1 July: The Workhouse of the South Dublin Union, with Davis Coakley. Host: Richmond Barracks, Mondays at the Mess series. Venue: Richmond Barracks, Off Bulfin Rd, Inchicore, Dublin 8. 11am. Admission €5, includes tea and scone. Tickets.

Wednesday 3 July: Liberating Ireland - Daniel O'Connell and the fight for Irish freedom, with Professor Patrick Geoghegan. Host & venue: Hill of Tara Centre, Castleboy, Co Meath. Free. All welcome.

Thursday 4 July: The Manchester Martyrs, and the West Cork Connections, with Robert J Bateman. Host: Duchas Clonakilty Heritage. Venue: The Parish Centre, Clonakilty, Co Cork. Free. 8:30pm. All welcome.

Sunday 7 July: Power and Politics in the Blackwater Valley, a one-day conference. Host and venue: Dromana House, Cappoquin, Co. Waterford. Four lectures, morning coffee, lunch and afternoon tea. 10:30am to 4pm. Inclusive fee of €75pp or €130 for two persons. For more details and to book, email info@dromanahouse.com or phone 086 8186305.

Monday 8 July: NLI Reading Room and Manuscript Room closed all day to facilitate the Library's continuing redevelopment of the premises. Venue: National Library of Ireland, Kildare Street, Dublin 2. All other services/exhibitons/cafe, including Genealogy Advisory Service, operate as normal.

Monday 8 July: Irish Genealogy: Life in the Past Lane, with Barbara Griffin. Host: Irish American Cultural Institute. Venue: Friendly Sons of The Shillelagh, 815 16th Ave, Belmar, New Jersey, USA. Free to IACI members. Guests $10. All welcome. Details and booking.

Tuesday 9 July: Headstones – their obvious and hidden messages, with John Nangle. Host: Genealocial Society of Ireland. Venue: DFEi, Cumberland St, Dun Laoghaire, Co Dublin. 8pm. All welcome. €3.

Wednesday 10 July: Tara and the Celtic Revival, with Professor Emeritus Muiris O Sullivan. Second of this year's Tara Lecture Series. Host: OPW - Office of Public Works. Venue: Hill of Tara Centre, Dunsany, Navan, Co. Meath. Admission is free but limited seating, so arrive early. All Welcome.

Friday 12 July: Bank Holiday (also Monday 15 July) in Northern Ireland. PRONI, private libraries and all public lending libraries across Northern Ireland will be closed until Tuesday 16 July. These public holidays do not apply in the Republic of Ireland.



Now online: Alen’s Register reveals C12th-C16th Dublin

https://drive.google.com/file/d/16r61ipT7WG-KKHTaIQtFjNbivrrAWokf/view?usp=sharing
Example of the ornate script to be found in the
Register of Archbishop John Alen, RCB Library
D6/3 folios 131r & 132.
Click for enlarged view.
As the RCB Library continues its efforts to digitize and make more resources available to a worldwide audience, the Liber Niger Alani being the record of John Alen (c.1476-1534), Archbishop of Dublin and Glendalough, 1530-34 (RCB Library D6/3) is now digitally available for public consultation on the Church of Ireland website.

The Liber Niger Alani, now also known as Alen's Register, is a collection of documents compiled by Alen recording all the lands and properties held by the dioceses. The earliest records he accounted for reached back as far as the conquest of Ireland in the 12th century and continue up to his own administrative era in the 1530s.

The volume is representative of Alen’s ambitious reforms which threatened the position of established powerful families in Ireland. In 1534, Archbishop Alen was murdered – his death being one of the opening acts of the Silken Thomas rebellion. Most of his property was seized by Cromwell as a tax for the Crown, but his Register remained safely housed along with the diocesan records at the archbishop’s palace, and is now secure in the custody of the RCB Library, accessioned as D6/3. Now, some 485 years after his death, his Register has been digitized to make its extraordinary content more accessible.

To accompany this significant digital release, topical analysis is provided by Julia McCarthy, a former undergraduate student at Trinity College Dublin, who worked in the RCB Library as an intern during the summer of 2017. Her analysis shows how Alen’s Register opens a window to pre-Reformation Tudor Dublin. See the RCB Library's Archive of the Month for July here.

To view the digitized version of the Register of Archbishop John Allen (c 1476-1534), including the muniments of the diocese of Dublin and Glendalough from c1172-1534, go to https://issuu.com/churchofireland/docs/alen.

Friday, 28 June 2019

County Donegal Workhouse records make online debut

FindMyPast has uploaded 433,398 records to its new County Donegal Workhouses collection. The records include admission and discharge registers as well as Board of Guardians’ Minute Books.

The registers and books span from 1840 to 1922 and comprise records from eight poor law unions across the county: Ballyshannon, Donegal, Dunfanaghy, Glentis, Inishowen, Letterkenny, Milford, and Stranorlar.

While the bulk of the collection is made up of the admission and discharge registers and BoG Minute Books, there are many other types of material to be searched in the record set.

Among them are accounts, death registers, letters, indoor and outdoor relief registers, dispensary notices, supplier contracts and other administrative documentation that kept the workhouses running and a tight control over inmates.

Each search result will provide an image of the original records and a transcript. Details will vary according to the type of document being accessed. Most will include name, sex, occupation, marital status, age, birth year, event date, admission/discharge/death date, previous residence, union, county, whether the document is typed or handwritten and an archival reference.

The original records are held by the Donegal County Council and have been digitised by Findmypast.

Thursday, 27 June 2019

National Library of Ireland unveils new book repository

The National Library of Ireland (NLI) has today unveiled a new book repository at its main Dublin premises in Kildare Street. The state-of-the-art facility, which is not open to the general public, will provide modern and safe storage for the national published collections. It contains 4.5 kilometres of shelving filled with 200,000 books. The work was funded under the Government’s Project Ireland 2040 programme, and the opening marks the completion of phase one of the Library’s multi-million euro capital development project.

The National Library of Ireland
Funding of €1.6 million was made available for this phase of development by the Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht (CHG) 2017. The work has been delivered collaboratively by the National Library, the Office of Public Works, and the Department of CHG.

Speaking at the official opening this morning, NLI Director Dr Sandra Collins said: “The completion of this phase of the Library’s capital development project is a huge milestone. The new book repository gives us the great relief of having safeguarded the national published collections, bringing them from poor conditions into modern, safe storage.

“This work represents the most significant development in collection care since the National Library of Ireland first opened its doors in 1890: when the Government presented us with a once in a lifetime opportunity of a major capital project, we acted swiftly and collaboratively to identify the most pressing works.

"At the time, given the exposure of our books to the risks of fire and water, we embarked on creating a new, fit-for-purpose book repository."

Phase one of the NLI’s capital development project encompassed moving 350,000 volumes from five floors of storage in the Victorian West Wing into both new onsite storage and high-quality offsite storage. During the course of the move, there was an audit of materials, with space and resource efficiencies identified after re-sizing of volumes, and after digitised, less-used and duplicate copies were moved to offsite storage.

Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Josepha Madigan TD, said: “While the phase one work may not be visible to the public, it represents a vital piece of investment that will help to safeguard the national collection for generations.

"The completion of phase one positions the NLI to now begin implementing its more public-facing developments. I am excited about seeing new visitor experiences at Kildare Street, as well as further opening up the Library as a place of research, learning and cultural engagement for everyone.”

The €14.7m NLI capital development plan will continue to 2021. The coming phases will include investigative works in the Library’s West Wing, an application for planning permission, and the development of new public spaces and services, as well as ensuring universal access for all visitors.

The NLI will remain open throughout, minimising disruption to its services for readers and visitors. The collection care carried out through 2017 – 2019 was facilitated by a temporary closure of the reading rooms on Mondays. This service will be restored from Monday 30 September.



RootsIreland.ie adds more Co Wexford church records

RootsIreland has added some 1,400 Roman Catholic records to its County Wexford database. All are from the Camolin Parish registers, as follows:

Camolin Baptisms: 1853-1885 (790 records)
Camolin Marriages: 1853-1930 (283 records)
Camolin Burials: (1853-1929 (325 records)

They join Roman Catholic records from 16 other parishes in the county. All pre-1881 transcriptions include links to the National Library of Ireland's images of the register pages.

To search the new records, go to http://wexford.rootsireland.ie and select Camolin from the ‘Parish / District’ drop down list. Login and Subscribe if required.

You can view a full list of the County Wexford records on RootsIreland here.

Wednesday, 26 June 2019

Update on TCD study of wealth in 14th century Ireland

Click to enlarge. Map reflects reflects the
economic state of Connaught before the Invasion
Readers of Irish Genealogy News may remember a blogpost from last July which reported on a study at Trinity College Dublin that was exploring parish incomes across 14th century Ireland.

A detailed update on the project has been published today and provides more information about the study's major findings, as well as maps and images of the resource materials used.

You can read the report here.

The study is led by PhD Researcher in Geography at Trinity, Christopher Chevallier, and supervised by Dr Mark Hennessy.

Tuesday, 25 June 2019

Local and regional museums receive exhibition grants

The Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Josepha Madigan TD, has announced a series of small grants for local and regional museums. Total funding of €138,100 is being made available under the Regional Museum Exhibitions Scheme 2019.

Nineteen projects out of twenty two are benefitting, including the Irish Workhouse Centre in Portumna, Galway for an exhibition reflecting the diverse cultural and historical background of the Irish workhouse system; the Little Museum of Dublin’s project called Remember, recording stories from museum visitors of past memories that they are reminded of on their tour of the museum; and Kerry Cultural & Literary Centre, for an exhibition focussing on the history of Listowel and North Kerry through the ages.

"These cultural bodies are often run on relatively modest budgets and to be in a position to offer support is a very positive thing", said Minister Madigan. "These bodies are often central focus points within the community and it is vital that they are supported in their role as guardians and narrators of our cultural heritage.

"The funding provided under this scheme over the past few years has allowed these cultural entities to continue to enhance the presentation of their exhibitions which, in turn, improves the cultural offering of the communities they serve.”

You can download the full list of successful projects here

Monday, 24 June 2019

Irish genealogy, history & heritage events, 24 June-7 July

Monday 24 June: NLI Reading Room and Manuscript Room closed all day to facilitate the Library's continuing redevelopment of the premises. Venue: National Library of Ireland, Kildare Street, Dublin 2. All other services/exhibitons/cafe, including Genealogy Advisory Service, operate as normal.

Tuesday 25 June: Cold Iron – Folklore on fishing, with Bairbre Ni Fhloinn. Host: Howth Peninsula Heritage Society. Venue: Howth Angling Centre, West Pier, Howth, Co Dublin. 8pm. All welcome. €5 on the door.

Wednesday 26 June: Irish Family History Assistance. Host: Genealogical Society of Victoria. Venue: GSV Library, Level 6, 85 Queen St., Melbourne 3000, Australia. Experienced helpers in the library to offer advice on your Irish research. 10am to 4pm. Free for members. $20 non-members. Bookable one-hour appointments with a research consultant. Details.

Wednesday 26 June: Our Place on the World Map, 1000-1600, with Dr Glynn Kelso. The inaugural D A Chart Seminar on Maps, named in memory of PRONI's first Deputy Keeper. Host and Venue: Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, Titanic Boulevard, Belfast. 12:30pm. Free. All welcome. Need to book. Details.

Wednesday 26 June: A Musical Tour of Richmond Barracks, with Bernie Tynan and Tony Casey. Host and venue: Mondays at the Mess series, Richmond Barracks, Off Bulfin Rd, Inchicore, Dublin 8. 11am. All welcome. Admission €3–€5. Tickets.

Thursday 27 June: Famine Irish Archiving and Digital Storytelling. Discover how Irish Famine emigrants are being traced in North America through cutting edge digital technology and online storytelling. Hosts: ADAPT Centre, National Heritage Trust and Strokestown Park House. Venue: Science Gallery, Trinity College, Pearse Street, Dublin 2. 6-8pm. Free but need to register.

Thursday 27 June: Anglo-Norman and Old English Cashel, with Dr Paul McCotter. Host: Cashel Heritage Forum's Within and Without the Walls lecture series. Venue: Parish Centre, Friar Street, Cashel, Co Tipperary. 7:30pm. Free. All welcome.

Friday 28 June: PRONI Workshop: Getting Started, an introductory workshop on essential skills for researching family and local history. Host and venue: PRONI, Titanic Boulevard, Belfast. 11am - 1pm. Free. Need to book.

Saturday 29 June: The Black and Tans to the Treaty, 1920-1921, with Mary Muldowney. The second of a two-part lecture explaining the tumultuous years of the Irish War of Independence. Host: Dublin City Public Libraries. Venue: Charleville Mall Library, North Strand, Dublin 1. 2:30pm. Book by phone 01 874 9619. Free. All welcome.

Saturday 29 June:  The Big House and Estate, conference. Host and venue: The Irish Workhouse Centre, Portumna, Co Galway. 9:30am to 4:30pm. This free conference includes refreshments and a snack lunch. Advance booking is essential as spaces are limited. Details.

Sunday 30 June: Book launch: Remembering the Past, a history of Killoughey Church and Cemetery, by Breda Condron. Venue: Killoughey Graveyard. Launch follows 7pm mass at the graveyard. Refreshments afterwards in Ard Aoibhinn, Rathkeeragan, Mount Bolus, Co Offaly. All welcome.

Monday 1 July: NLI Reading Room and Manuscript Room closed all day to facilitate the Library's continuing redevelopment of the premises. Venue: National Library of Ireland, Kildare Street, Dublin 2. All other services/exhibitons/cafe, including Genealogy Advisory Service, operate as normal.

Monday 1 July: The Workhouse of the South Dublin Union, with Davis Coakley. Host: Richmond Barracks, Mondays at the Mess series. Venue: Richmond Barracks, Off Bulfin Rd, Inchicore, Dublin 8. 11am. All welcome. Admission €5, includes tea and scone. Tickets.

Tuesday 2 July: C4, the Research Centre of the NIFHS, is closed throughout July. Venue: Unit C4, Valley Business Centre, 67 Church Road, Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, BT36 7LS. Reopens 4 August.

Wednesday 3 July: Liberating Ireland - Daniel O'Connell and the fight for Irish freedom, with Professor Patrick Geoghegan. Hosts: OPW - Tara Lecture Series. Venue: Hill of Tara Centre, Castleboy, Co Meath. Admission free but limited seating, so arrive early. All welcome.

Thursday 4 July: The Manchester Martyrs, and the West Cork Connections, with Robert J Bateman. Host: Duchas Clonakilty Heritage. Venue: The Parish Centre, Clonakilty, Co Cork. Free. 8:30pm. All welcome.

Sunday 7 July: Power and Politics in the Blackwater Valley, a one-day conference. Host and venue: Dromana House, Cappoquin, Co. Waterford. Four lectures, morning coffee, lunch and afternoon tea. 10:30am to 4pm. Inclusive fee of €75pp or €130 for two persons. For more details and to book, email info@dromanahouse.com or phone 086 8186305.

Saturday, 22 June 2019

Celebrate Canada Day with $40 off AncestryDNA

AncestryDNA is running a sale in Canada (only) to mark Canada Day 2019.

https://prf.hn/click/camref:1101l4phT/creativeref:1100l27973It offers a discount of $40 CAD for each test kit ordered, reducing the price to $89 CAD plus shipping.

AncestryDNA offers the largest consumer network – 15million and counting – giving you the best chance of matching with close and distant cousins and identifying extended family. Additionally, AncestryDNA's ability to identify ethnic heritage has grown in the last week, with markers for likely ancestral connections continuing to be pinpointed to specific locations. The company refers to these geographical DNA groupings as Genetic Communities.

Of particular interest to Canadian-based researchers is the recent addition of 120+ new Canadian Communities, with greater insights about British Canadian, French Canadian, and Acadian settlers.

In total, AncestryDNA ethnicity estimates now draw on the identification of some 500 Genetic Communities.

The Canada Day sale will end at 11:59 ET on Monday 1 July.



The content above contains affiliate links. This means I may earn a small commission if you buy via these links. This does not affect the price you pay as a consumer, but it does contribute to keeping IrishGenealogyNews online. See Advertising Disclosure tab above.

Friday, 21 June 2019

Former Magdalene laundry to be a 'site of conscience'

The site of a former Magdalene laundry in Dublin's inner city is to be turned into a "site of conscience" within the next five years.

Magdalene Laundries were workhouses run by the Roman Catholic Church for so-called 'fallen women', unmarried mothers and orphans. They are rightly considered a cruel and dark stain on Ireland's history – one that must never be repeated, nor forgotten.

From Google Maps
The former Gloucester Street laundry
So an attempt last year to sell and demolish the building on Sean McDermott (previously Gloucester) Street to make way for a new Japanese-owned hotel found itself blocked last year by Dublin City councillors. A campaign, led by survivors of the laundries, argued that the building, the last such laundry to close* in Ireland and still owned by the state, should be retained to recognise the social, cultural and personal history experienced by many Dublin residents.

The laundry's Site of Conscience status recognises that the building is a historic site where initiatives on-site aim to connect past struggles to today's movements for human rights, and was confirmed as part of the Dublin City Agreement between Fianna Fail, Labour, Green Party and Social Democrats, which was signed earlier this week. It reads: 'We will develop a multipurpose Site of Conscience at the location of the former Magdalene laundry on Sean McDermott Street that will seek to honour and commemorate the victims and survivors of Ireland's Institutional past.'

*in 1996

Power & Politics in the Blackwater Valley, Sunday 7 July

Dromana House and Gardens, Cappoquin
A one-day conference – Power and Politics in the Blackwater Valley – will be held in the elegant surroundings of Dromana House, Cappoquin, Co. Waterford on Sunday 7 July.

The event includes morning coffee, lunch and afternoon tea and it runs from 10:30am to 4pm. There's an inclusive fee of €75pp or €130 for two persons.

For more details and to book, email info@dromanahouse.com or phone 086 8186305.

The day's programme includes the following four talks:

Liberation: Waterford and the Winning of Civil Rights in the Age of Daniel O'Connell
, with Professor Patrick Geoghehan

Richard Boyle, Earl of Cork: Statesman and Warlord (1629-1643)
, with Dr Dave Edwards

Home truths about Walter Raleigh, Richard Boyle and Edmund Spenser
, with Professor Tadgh O'Keeffe

Power struggles: marriages and money in an Anglo-Irish family in the 19th century, with Patrick Cockburn.

FindMyPast adds 5.7m United States Obituary Notices

FindMyPast has added a further 5.7million records to its United States Obituary Notices collection. The top-up brings the total of transcriptions in the record set to more than 38million, all indexed from the tributes.com and currentobituary.com websites.

The detailed transcriptions provide first name, surname, birth date, death date and place, and the obituary text, plus a link to the source website where additional information and photos may be found.

Inevitably, there are a lot of Irish surnames in the index, most of them relating to deaths in the 20th century and the early 21st, making this collection useful for locating Irish immigrants and their descendents.



The content above contains affiliate links. This means I may earn a small commission if you buy via these links. This does not affect the price you pay as a consumer, but it does contribute to keeping IrishGenealogyNews online. See Advertising Disclosure tab above.