Thursday, 26 November 2020

3-week summary of new/updated US genealogy records

Below is a summary of US family history collections that have been released or updated by the major genealogy databases in the last three weeks. (The previous summary list was published on 3 November, see blogpost).

My regular summaries are designed to help family historians whose Irish ancestors emigrated, temporarily or permanently, to the United States.

By default, they should also be useful to anyone carrying out research in the US, regardless of the origin of their ancestors.

The figures in parenthesis in the New Collections section are the numbers of records/images in each new record set, if provided by the database.

Unless otherwise stated, the figures in parenthesis in the Updated Collections section reflect the number of records added to the collection in the recent update, if a number has been clearly noted by the supplier. I do not include updates of fewer than 1,000 records.


NEW COLLECTIONS


AmericanAncestors

Ancestry

FamilySearch

FindMyPast


UPDATED COLLECTIONS


AmericanAncestors
Ancestry

FamilySearch

Some of the above content contains affiliate links. This means I may earn a small commission if you buy via these links. This does not affect the price you pay as a consumer, but it does contribute to keeping Irish Genealogy News online. See Advertising Disclosure tab above.

Ireland's Registry of Deeds Index Project keeps growing

Nick Reddan FIGRS, the founder and manager of the online Registry of Deeds Index Project has completed another upload of transcribed entries.

It brings the number of entries in the main index to 386,083 transcribed from 41,185 memorials of deeds. All these records have been submitted by volunteers.

In addition, the Grantors index transcription now holds 40,000 entries, including all those from A-E for 1708–29, and the Townlands Index has 78,687 entries.

All the data on the site is free to access.

Tuesday, 24 November 2020

Irish genealogy/history events online, 24 Nov-mid Dec

Here's a round up of Irish genealogy, history and heritage events, all of them online in one guise or another, taking place in the next few weeks. I'll add to it if I come across any more.

Tuesday 24 November: A Beginners Guide to using DNA for Family History, with Martin McDowell (NIFHS). Host: Public Record Office of Northern Ireland. 2pm. Free. On Zoom. Booking required.

Tuesday 24 November: Lisburn – The Burnings, 1920, with Pearse Lawlor. Host: Irish Linen Centre & Lisburn Museum. Free. Online via YouTube at 7pm. Book by telephone 02892663377 or email to ilc.reception@lisburncastlereagh.gov.uk for link.

Thursday 26 November: From Turmoil to Truce: Photographs of the War of Independence, a virtual exhibition tour. Host: National Library Photographic Archive. All welcome. 11am on Zoom. Free. Booking required.

Thursday 26 November: Researching Presbyterians in Ireland, with Dr William Roulston (UHF). Host: Public Record Office of Northern Ireland. On Zoom. Free. 2-3pm. Fully booked. Join waitlist.

Thursday 26 November:Land Indexes at the Registry of Deeds, with Rob Goodbody, Una Palic and Dr Conchubhar O Crualaoich. Host: PRA of Ireland. Zoom. Free. 3pm–4:15pm. Need to book. Fully booked.

Thursday 26 November: The other great pandemic: Spanish flu in Ireland 1918-19, with Dr Ida Milne. Host: South Dublin Libraries Decade of Centenaries programme. All welcome. Free. 7pm on Zoom. Booking essential.

Thursday 26 November: Social life in Pre-Reformation Dublin, 1450–1540, a webinar with Dr Peadar Slattery. Host: Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland. 7:30&8:30pm. All welcome. €5. Tickets.

Friday 27 November: The Dead of the Revolution. Dr Darragh Gannon interviews Professor Eunan O'Halpin, one of the authors of the newly published book, which itendifies a total of 2,850 deaths arising from 1916-1921. Host: Public Record Office of Northern Ireland. 2pm-3pm. Free. On Zoom. Register.

Friday 27 November: Electioneering and Propaganda in Ireland, 1917-1921 – Votes, Violence and Victory. Dr Ciaran Wallace interviews Dr Elaine Callinan about her new book (Four Courts Press). Host: Carlow College. 3pm-4pm. Zoom. All welcome. Free. Register.

Friday 27 November: Michael Collins and the War in the Shadows, with Dr Myles Dungan. Host: Muckross House Research Library. To receive Zoom link email library@muckross.ie before 5.30, Wednesday 25th November. Talk is free. 7:30pm.

Friday 27 – Monday 30 November: The Spirit of Mother Jones Festival. Lectures, music and more, all online, free on Cork Community TV. No registration required. See Schedule.

Saturday 28 November: Celebrating Carlow Scallions with History, Folklore, Music and Song. An online family-friendly event for everyone with Carlow connections. 1pm–2pm. Zoom. All welcome. Email folklore.ie@gmail.com to register. Details.

Tuesday 1 December: Peace After The Final Battle: The Irish Revolution, 100 Years on, with John Dornay and Eamon Delaney. Host: National Library of Ireland. 7pm on Zoom. Free. Booking required.

Tuesday 1 December: Cartography and Settlement in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries, with Annaleigh Margey. The 2020 D.A. Chart Seminar on Maps. Host: Public Record Office of Northern Ireland. 7pm to 8:15pm. Free. On Zoom. Tickets.

Thursday 3 December: Neutrals, Immigrants, Aliens, Evacuees: The Irish In Britain during WW2, with Dr. Jennifer Redmond. Host: Host: Public Record Office of Northern Ireland. 7pm. Free. On Zoom. Register.

Friday 4 December:The other great pandemic: Spanish flu in Ireland 1918-19, with Dr Ida Milne. Host: Muckross House Research Library. All welcome. To receive Zoom link email library@muckross.ie before 5.30, Wednesday 2nd December. Talk is free. 7:30pm.

Tuesday 8 December: Centenaries, 1920-23: commemorations, conflict and conciliation, with Prof Brian Walker. Host: Irish Linen Centre & Lisburn Museum. Free. Online via YouTube at 7pm. Book by telephone 02892663377 or email to ilc.reception@lisburncastlereagh.gov.uk for link.

Friday 11 December: 1920: A Year of Terror, with Liz Gillis. Host: Muckross House Research Library. All welcome. To receive Zoom link email library@muckross.ie before 5.30, Wednesday 9th December. Talk is free. 7:30pm.

Monday, 23 November 2020

Ancestry DNA: Lowest prices of the year for IE, UK, Oz

Ancestry has launched its Cyber Sale 2020 to Irish, Australian and UK researchers, offering its lowest prices of the year for Ancestry DNA testing kits.

In each case, the prices shown below exclude shipping costs.

The regular and discounted prices are shown below. The discounts will run until 11:59pm GMT/AEDT on Monday 30 November.

To take advantage of these low prices, click the flag that's most appropriate to where you live:


https://prf.hn/click/camref:1011l4pku/creativeref:1011l28284
Ireland – Ancestry DNA test kit price reduced from €95 to €55. Save €40 (42%)

https://prf.hn/click/camref:1100l4pTC/creativeref:1011l28276
UK – Ancestry DNA test kit reduced from £79 to £49. Save £30 (38%)

https://prf.hn/click/camref:1100l4pTB/creativeref:1100l27965
Australia – Ancestry DNA test kit reduced from $129 to $85. Save $44 (34%)



Some of the above content contains affiliate links. This means I may earn a small commission if you buy via these links. This does not affect the price you pay as a consumer, but it does contribute to keeping Irish Genealogy News online. See Advertising Disclosure tab above.

25% discount on 12-month sub to RootsIreland.ie

It's always a big deal when RootsIreland.ie offers a discount, and this one is no exception, with a 25% discount available now on 12-month subscriptions.

As most Irish family historians will already be aware, RootsIreland has the most complete and accurate set of online Roman Catholic church records. Those dated to c1880 link to the National Library of Ireland's online register images, where available.

Unlike most other online databases, however, RootsIreland's collection of transcriptions continues past these dates, in some counties and parishes continuing to 1920 or even later. 

The database, which is managed by the Irish Family History Foundation (IFHF), currently holds more than 23million records.

It is continually updated with records transcribed by genealogists working in the IFHF's network of 34 genealogy centres across the island. In 2020 so far, more than 500,000 records have been added from counties Limerick, Sligo, Kerry, Wicklow, Kilkenny and Westmeath, and South Dublin. 

Additional records from counties Kilkenny and Clare are expected to join the database shortly.l

To take advantage of the special offer, place your order by 11:59pm Irish Time on Thursday 10 December.

To check what is available on RootsIreland for each county, check out the online sources menu.

Advance notice (24 November): The website will be offline between 8 pm and 9 pm (Irish Time / GMT) on Thursday 26 November.

Ireland’s prehistoric rock art: free booklet published

A free online booklet has been published by the Heritage Council on Ireland's prehistoric rock art, which can be found in many parts of the island.

While the passage grave cemeteries of Newgrange and Knowth are already world famous, there are many other examples, and this new book – Rock Art, by archaeologist Clare Busher O’Sullivan – explores the art form; where it can be found; what it means; and how it can be protected.

Rock art is carved, drawn, painted, engraved, or incised imagery on natural rock surfaces. Ireland's examples are known as ‘open-air’ Atlantic rock art, a carving practice that was widespread across Atlantic Europe, including in Scotland, England, France, Spain and Portugal. Unlike megalithic art, which is associated with monuments, open-air Atlantic rock art is typically found on boulders and outcrops. The Atlantic tradition dates to the Later Neolithic / Early Bronze Age period (c3000-1500 BC). In Ireland, examples of this ancient art can be found in clusters in Carlow / Wicklow; Louth / Monaghan, Fermanagh and Donegal. However, the densest concentration can be found in the Cork / Kerry region.

“In Ireland, the most common motif in Atlantic rock art is the ‘cup-mark’, which is a circular human-made depression in the rock surface," says Clare Busher O’Sullivan. "The cup-mark is often surrounded by one or more concentric rings. The art is referred to in Ireland and Britain as ‘cup and ring art’. The rock art is located in rural landscapes, often in open valleys or the foothills of mountains and almost always in close proximity to water sources.”

There is no definitive explanation for the art, although there many theories. Some researchers believe that the placement of rock art marks boundaries and routeways within prehistoric landscapes, while others think rock art marks places of worship and pilgrimage in prehistoric society.

Launching the new richly-illustrated 28-page booklet, the Heritage Council's Head of Conservation, Ian Doyle, said: "While this form of open-air art is widely known to archaeologists, it is not well known to the general public. We hope that this publication on Atlantic rock art will bring this internationally important but enigmatic form of prehistoric art to a wider consciousness and that walkers and landowners will be able to identify more of it and be aware of the need to care for it.

"The new publication also includes the ‘Rock Art Code’, which provides guidance for members of the public visiting rock art sites and interacting with decorated panels, and the landowners.”

The Rock Art booklet can be downloaded in pdf format from the Heritage Council website. Information on visiting rock art locally can be found on the Historic Environment Viewer on www.archaeology.ie

Some examples of where open-air rock art can be found include:

  • Wicklow: Concentrations to the west / south-west of Roundwood in Co Wicklow, in close proximity to Lough Dan. There is another high concentration in Ballykean, between Kilbride and Redcross, and some scattered examples between Aughrim and Avoca.
  • Carlow: Rock art panels concentrated in multiple townlands around Borris.
  • Louth: In Louth, clusters occur to the north of the county between Kilcurly and Inishkeen, to the west of Dundalk.
  • Donegal: In the Inishowen Peninsula in Donegal, the townlands of Carrowreagh/ Craignacally and Magheranaul have very high concentrations.
  • Cork/Kerry: They are scattered on Cork's Mizen Peninsula. On the northern part of the Iveragh peninsula of Co Kerry, the townlands of Letter West, Kealduff Upper and Coomasaharn have some impressive rock art panels on privately owned land. On the Dingle Peninsula, the townland of Kilmore has a high concentration of rock art.
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Friday, 20 November 2020

Irish Newspapers Archive: Half price Black Friday deal

Coo-ee! What about this for a super-duper discount from Irish Newspaper Archives. The Dublin-based supplier is offering a whopping 50% saving on monthly and annual subscriptions to its silver and gold historical newspaper packages.

It's this year's Black Friday Deal, but it's already live and will remain so until end of play on Sunday 29 November.

The archive holds more than nine million pages from 212 Irish daily and regional newspaper titles published from 1738 to current editions.

The Silver Subscription provides access and pdf downloads to more than 80 local and national titles (they are listed on this page... scroll down to the green list). 

The standard costs for this package are reduced as follows: 

  • One month: down from £29 to £14.50 
  • Annual: reduced from £149 to £74.50.

The Gold Subscription provides access and pdf downloads to all titles in the Silver sub, plus 115 'Radical' publications (they are listed on this page... scroll down and choose the green list for regular titles and grey list for radical titles). 

The standard costs for this package are reduced as follows: 

  • One month: down from £36.50 to £18.25 
  • Annual: reduced from £169 to £84.50.
To take advantage of this rare half price offer from IrishNewsArchive, see this dedicated Black Friday Sale page or click the image above.

FindMyPast adds 350k British/Irish military records

FindMyPast has added some 350,000 records to its British and Irish Military Collections, as follows:

Ireland, Londonderry (Derry) War Memorial 1914-1918

The Diamond War Memorial, Derry City
The Diamond War Memorial in Derry City lists 754 locals who lost their lives in WWI.

The memorial dominates the city's main square where the old walled city's four main streets meet. It features an infantry soldier and a sailor, each poised for battle, at the base of a column topped by an angel.

The records include a transcript and image of handwritten forms completed by the deceased's next of kin. As such, the details provided vary but the following information is usually included: Rank, Regiment, Company/unit, Soldier number, Military awards, Residence (and connection to the City), Death date, Nature of death, Name + address + relationship and signature of next of kin.

British Armed Forces Soldiers' Wills 1850-1986

This new index of 190,282 entries relates to a collection of wills written by privates and non-commissioned officers who served in the Army and Air Force.

Soldiers on active service were encouraged to make a short, handwritten and signed will. It was usually completed in their pay book. With details from the index you can order a copy of the orignal will.

British Red Cross & Order of St John Enquiry List, Wounded & Missing, 1914-1919

These 158,035 records can help you unlock details about the First World War’s wounded and missing that you won’t find in other sources. They were compiled by the The British Red Cross & Order of St John in regular lists of WW1 soldiers missing in action, about whom enquiries had been made.

Typical information includes a man’s name, regiment, battalion and company (for infantry battalions). Details about the date and place of casualty, and sometimes extensive additional information are included.

 

 

Some of the above content contains affiliate links. This means I may earn a small commission if you buy via these links. This does not affect the price you pay as a consumer, but it does contribute to keeping Irish Genealogy News online. See Advertising Disclosure tab above.

Thursday, 19 November 2020

Researching Presbyterians in Ireland: lecture and book

To mark the publication of his latest book, Researching Presbyterians in Ireland, Dr William Roulston will be presenting an online lecture on Thursday 26 November, hosted by the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland.

The talk will include an overview of the range of records relating to the various strands of Presbyterians in Ireland over the last four centuries, and will include documentation created by individual congregations, as well as the records created by the higher courts of Presbyterianism and the personal papers of Presbyterian ministers.

Registration for the free event is required and you can find full details on Eventbrite.

Dr Roulston has been Research Director of the Ulster Historical Foundation (UHF) since 2006 and has written and edited a number of publications on Irish and especially Ulster history. His new book explores the many shades of Prebyterianism; the records (congregational, baptism and marriage registers) each produced and where they can be found by researchers.

It also provides information about Presbyterian ministers, places of worship/burial, education and publications, and sets out details about a selection of other Irish genealogy record collections where Presbyterian ancestors may be discovered.

The 192-page paperback is available from the UHF at BooksIreland for a very modest £9.99.

Wednesday, 18 November 2020

What's new for Canadian genealogy: 7-week summary

Below is a summary of Canadian family history collections that have been either newly released or updated by the major genealogy databases during the last seven weeks. The last summary list was published on 29 September, see blogpost).

These regular listings of additional sources are designed primarily to help family historians whose Irish ancestors emigrated to Canada, but you don't have to have heritage from Ireland!

They may prove useful to any researcher looking for a brief update of what's been recently made available for tracing ancestors in Canada.

Unless otherwise stated, the figures in parenthesis reflect the number of records in a new collection, or the total number in a topped-up collection (if provided by the database owner). I don't usually include updates of less than one thousand records.


NEW COLLECTIONS


Ancestry

FamilySearch

UPDATED COLLECTIONS


Ancestry
FamilySearch

MyHeritage

Some of the above content contains affiliate links. This means I may earn a small commission if you buy via these links. This does not affect the price you pay as a consumer, but it does contribute to keeping Irish Genealogy News online. See Advertising Disclosure tab above.