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Friday, 19 January 2018

Irish News Archive: new titles, more content and big discounts

Click to learn more
Irish Newspaper Archives, the Dublin-based database of historical papers published in Ireland, has added two new titles – The Irish Daily Independent and The Limerick Chronicle – and uploaded significant amounts of additional content from two other titles already represented in the online archive.

The new titles:

Irish Daily Independent 1893–1904
The Irish Daily Independent was first published at the end of 1891. It went on to absorb the Daily Nation from September 1900.

Limerick Chronicle 1994–2001
Established in 1768, the Limerick Chronicle was first published by John Ferrar, a prominent bookseller and printer in Limerick.

Updated Content:

Waterford News & Star 1980–1999
With this update,the holding of the online archive now spans 169 years offering insight into local and the national events.

The Sligo Champion 1916–1949
First published in 1836, The Sligo Champion is one of Ireland’s oldest and leading regional newspaper titles. On the day of its first publication, crowds gathered outside the premises from 8am, even thought the paper not due for release until 1pm.

Discounts on offer

To mark the arrival of the new titles and content, Irish Newspaper Archives has two discount options available until 31 January 2018:
  • A 30% discount on an annual subscription, reducing the price from $/£/€149 to $/£/€104.30 : use promotion code IDI30,
  • A 25% discount on a monthly subscription, reducing the price from $/£/€29 to $/£/€21.75: use promotion code ISI25



Mayo mountain burial chamber: human remains are 5,000 years old

Scientific anaylsis of ancient human remains found by hillwalkers on Ben Gorm in County Mayo has revealed that the bones are more than 5,000 years old.

View from Ben Gorm.  Photographer Robert Bone. Source Wikipedia.
View from Ben Gorm.
Photographer Robert Bone. Source Wikipedia.
The discovery in August 2016 was made by local hillwalker Michael Chambers, who came accross some massive boulders and a cave-like space on the mountain in the northwest of the county. Human bones were scattered over the rock floor. Once it had been determined that the remains were ancient, the National Monuments Service of the Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, in consultation with the National Museum of Ireland, commissioned a rescue excavation which was carried out by excavation director Dr Marion Dowd of IT Sligo.

“Large pieces of quartz had been placed in and around the bones, Dr Dowd explains. "When the radiocarbon dates came through it was very exciting. Not only were the bones Neolithic, but the dates showed the site had been used for over 1,000 years." At least 10 individuals – adults, adolescents and children – were placed in the chamber. One of the adult bones dated to 3,600 BC while a bone of a child skeleton dated to 2,400 BC.

The research has suggested that bodies were brought into the cave chamber and laid out in a pit. At some later point, the skulls might have been deliberately broken as part of a complex burial ritual and the larger bones removed.

Dr Linda Lynch, the osteoarchaeologist who examined the human bones, said this was not a burial place as such. “It was a ritual place where bodies were placed to decompose. Only a very small proportion of each skeleton was found, with the majority of bones apparently deliberately removed. The discovery indicates highly complex processing of the dead.”

Josepha Madigan TD, Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, praised the local hillwalkers for reporting their find: “This is a fascinating archaeological discovery and I want to thank the community of hill walkers for reporting it to us. Such vigilance is extremely important to us in helping to protect and understand our archaeological heritage.

"The excavation has provided a glimpse into prehistoric Ireland over 5,000 years ago. Such discoveries show the enduring capacity of archaeology to enthral and demonstrate how advances in scientific research are affording us a better understanding of Ireland’s ancient past and its people."

Wednesday, 17 January 2018

British Newspaper Archive sub: 30% discount available

https://www.awin1.com/cread.php?awinmid=5895&awinaffid=123532&clickref=&p=https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk%2Faccount%2Fsubscribe%3FPromotionCode%3DBNASAVE30
The British Newspaper Archive is offering a 30% discount on a 12-month subscription.

With some 150+ titles from across the island of Ireland, and a vast number of papers published in Great Britain, the British Newspaper Archive offers access to millions of historical newspaper pages. With the discount, you'd have one year of unlimited access to this huge database for just £55.97 for the year.

To take advantage of the discount, click the image. You'll find the promotion code is already entered when you arrive at the subscription page.

The discount expires at 11:59pm on Sunday 28 January.

Tuesday, 16 January 2018

Ireland Genealogy Projects Archives: first 2018 update

Burrishoole Abbey, Mayo. Click for larger image.
Photo courtesy of Bernie McCafferty & IGP Archives
The files below have been added to Ireland Genealogy Projects Archives.

They have been submitted by volunteers and are free to view by all Irish family historians.

CLARE Genealogy Archives - Headstones
Clooney Graveyard

CAVAN Genealogy Archives - Headstones
Drumkeerin Presbyterian Graveyard

DONEGAL Genealogy Archives - Headstones
Stranorlar Famine Graveyard
Stranorlar Parish Church (CoI) Graveyard - Part 2

DUBLIN Genealogy Archives - Headstones
Deansgrange, St. Anne's Section Pts 9 & 10

LONGFORD Genealogy Archives - Wills
Edgeworth, William Jan 20, 1827 - Will (names sister Maria)

MONAGHAN & FERMANAGH Genealogy Archives - Church Records
Clones Parish Registers, Burials 1815-1816 (E. Div.)

MAYO Genealogy Archives - Headstones
Burrishoole Abbey, Part 3

WATERFORD Genealogy Archives - Headstones
Dunmore East, Lost at Sea Plaques

WESTMEATH Genealogy Archives - Headstones
Street, St. James (CoI) Graveyard

WEXFORD Genealogy Archives - Newspapers
Workhouse Entries - Assorted Dates (Updated)

Monday, 15 January 2018

5-day Irish Genealogy Essentials courses: 2018 dates

Ulster Historical Foundation is based at
the Corn Exhange Building in central Belfast
The Ulster Historical Foundation will run its intensive Irish Genealogy Essentials course on the following dates this year:
  • 5 February to 9 February
  • 30 April to 4 May
  • 13 to 19 June
The course is delivered by the Ulster Historical Foundation’s experienced staff and includes a week of intensive learning with practical demonstrations using relevant websites and other electronic resources, and one and a half days of guided research in the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI).

It is ideal for those who are relatively new to Irish family history and wish to get to grips with research techniques, archives and genealogical sources in Ireland, but will also benefit those with more experience in genealogy who will learn about lesser-known sources, many of them not online and available only in archives.

Participants have full access to the UHF's research and newspaper library and electronic resources, and the expertise of its staff, and receive an orientation tour at PRONI.

The classroom-based elements of the course are held in the Corn Exchange Building, 31 Gordon Street, Belfast, BT1 2LG. For full details see UHF's website.

Irish genealogy and history events, 15-28 January

Monday 15 Jan: NLI Reading Room and Manuscript Room closed. Venue: National Library of Ireland, Kildare Street, Dublin 2. On-going Monday closures are to facilitate extensive redevelopment of the premises. All other services/exhibitons/cafe and Genealogy Service operating as normal. Details.

Monday 15 Jan: The Clontarf Atlas (Irish Historic Towns Atlas series from RIA), with Professor Colm Lennon. Host: Clontarf Historical Society. Venue: Resource Centre, St John the Baptist Church, Clontarf Road, Dublin 3. Plus AGM. Members free / non-members €5. All welcome. 7:30pm.

Monday 15 Jan: Newspapers, books and eBay for genealogy, with Michael McKeag. Host: North of Ireland Family History Society, Foyle branch. Venue: Lecture Room of Derry City’s Central Library, 35 Foyle Street, Londonderry, BT48 6AL. Lecture cancelled due to weather warnings.

Monday 15 Jan: Queen Victoria’s Gene, with Jenning Cumming. Host: North of Ireland Family History Society, Larne branch. Larne Bowling & Lawn Tennis Club, 112-120 Glenarm Road, Larne, BT40 1DZ. Free. 7:30pm.

Monday 15 Jan: The Rise & Fall of Lord Dunkellin (1827-1867), with John Joe Conwell. Host: Birr Historical Society. Venue: County Arms Hotel, Birr, Co Offaly. 8pm. All welcome.

Tuesday 16 January: The Quakers of County Tipperary, 1655–1924, with Dr Michael Ahern. Host: Tipperary People & Places Lecture Series. Venue: Tipperary Studies, The Source, Cathedral Street, Thurles, Co Tipperary. 7:30pm. Admission free. All welcome. Details.

Tuesday 16 January: Disturbing Remains: Death in the Great Famine, with Dr Breandán Mac Suibhne. Host: Irish Historical Society. Venue: Centre for Irish Programmes, Boston College, 43 St Stephen's Green, Dublin 2. Free. 7.00pm. All welcome.

Tuesday 16 January: From 2RN to RTÉ, with Harry Bradshaw, and (short talk) The Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918, with Pádraig Laffan. Host: Foxrock Local History Club. Venue: Foxrock Pastoral Centre (at rear of Foxrock Church), Dublin 18. 8pm. All welcome. Members free/non-members €5.

Wednesday 17 January: The Tavener Family, with Tom Mason. Host: North of Ireland Family History Society, North Armagh branch. Venue: Bleary Community Centre, 1 Deans Road, Bleary, Craigavon, Co Armagh, BT66 7AS.

Wednesday 17 January: Tudor Marshals of Leinster, with Diarmuid Wheeler. Host: Carlow Historical & Archaeological Society. Venue: Leighlinbridge Parish Centre, Leighlinbridge, Co Carlow. Admission is free and all welcome. 8pm. 

Wednesday 17 January: The Corless Family, with Anna Bruzzi. Also AGM. Host: Western Family History Association. Venue: Parish Centre, Lackagh, Co Galway. 8pm. All welcome.

Wednesday 17 January: Philip Barron, Man of Mystery, with Áine Uí Fhoghlú. Host: Waterford County Museum. Venue: Clubhouse, Dungarvan Harbour Sailing Club, Davitt's Quay, Dungarvan, Co Waterford. 8pm. All welcome. €5 admission. Details.

Thursday 18 January: London's Derrie: The background to the building and financing of the early Londonderry plantation, with Professor James Stevens Curl. Host: Ulster Historical Foundation. Venue: The Corn Exchange Building, 31 Gordon Street, Belfast BT1 2LG. 12:15pm to 2pm. Free to Guild members. £5 to non-members. Need to register. Details.

Thursday 18 January: From war to wine, from shipping to sport: Irish-French links over 300 years, with Kieran Walsh. Host: Dunhill History Lectures, Series XII, 2018. Venue: Dunhill Multi-Education Centre (opposite GAA grounds), Dunhill, Co Waterford. 8pm. Admission €5, includes light refreshments. All welcome.

Thursday 18 January: Hanna Sheehy-Skeffington (1877–1946)– suffragette and nationalist, wife of martyred radical activist Francis and co-founder of Irish women's Franchise League, with Dr. Margaret Ward. First of the Rebel Irish Women lecture series. Host and venue: GPO Witness History Visitor Centre, O'Connell Street, Dublin 1. Free. 5:40pm sharp. Booking is essential to guarantee your space.

Saturday 20 January: Investigating Offaly's casualties of the Great War, with Stephen Callaghn. Host: Western Front Association. Venue: Museum of Decorative Arts and History, Collins Barracks, Benburb's Street, Dublin 7. 2:30pm. All welcome. €3.

Saturday 20 January: Moving into Intermediate Research, with Audrey Leonard. Host: Irish Genealogical Society International. Venue: Celtic Junction Arts Center, Celtic Junction, 836 Prior Avenue, St Paul, MN 55104, USA. 10:30am to Noon. Cost: $15 for members/$20 for non-member. Register here.

Monday 22 Jan: NLI Reading Room and Manuscript Room closed. Venue: National Library of Ireland, Kildare Street, Dublin 2. On-going Monday closures are to facilitate extensive redevelopment of the premises. All other services/exhibitons/cafe, including Genealogy Advisory Service operating as normal. Details.

Tuesday 23 January: The Tanner's Tale, with Paul Duffy. Host: More Tales of Medieval Dublin lecture series. Venue: Wood Quay Venue, Dublin City Council, Civic Offices, Wood Quay, Dublin 8. 1:05–1:55pm. Free. All welcome.

Tuesday 23 January: Using Newspaper Archives, with Mike McKeag. Host: North of Ireland Family History Society, Belfast Branch. Venue: C. S. Lewis Room, Holywood Arches Library, 4-12 Holywood Road, Belfast, BT4 1NT. All welcome. 7:30pm. Free.

Tuesday 23 January: What might St Finbarr's monastery have looked like? with Tomas O Carragain. Part of the 'Cork: Origins of a City' public talks series. Host and venue: St Peter's Cork, North Main Street, Cork City. 5pm. All welcome.

Thursday 25 January: ’My ancestor was sent to Gaol – Horray!” The Petty Sessions Court and prison records as genealogical sources, with Tony Hennessy MAGI. Host: Dunhill History Lectures, Series XII, 2018. Venue: Dunhill Multi-Education Centre (opposite GAA grounds), Dunhill, Co Waterford. 8pm. Admission €5, includes light refreshments. All welcome.

Thursday 25 January: Shops and shopkeepers in Clonakilty, 1870–1920, with Carmel Flahavan. Host: Duchas Clonakilty Heritage. Venue: The Parish Centre, Clonakilty, Co Cork. 8pm. All welcome.

Thursday 25 January: Family connections using DNA, with Martin McDowell. Host: North of Ireland Family History Society, Ballymena Branch. Venue: Michelin Arts Workshop, Braid Arts Centre 1-29 Bridge Street, Ballymena, BT43 5EJ. 7:15pm. Free. All welcome.

Friday, 12 January 2018

NLI RC Registers will be offline from 9am Monday 15th

https://registers.nli.ie/
It's good to receive advance warning of sites being offline, and all the more so when the site is as important to Irish genealogists as the NLI's Roman Catholic Parish Registers images database.

The National Library of Ireland has advised that the database will be offline from 9am on Monday 15 January. This is to facilitate essential maintenance to the site (there were problems with access earlier this week, so the two are probably connected).

It is expected that the database will be back online during Monday afternoon.

UPDATE, 15 January, 8pm: Looks like things didn't quite work out as anticipated. This evening, the entire nli.ie site is offline. There doesn't seem to have been any official comment about this, so I can't provide any further information at present.

UPDATE, 15 January, 9:30pm: Registers site is back up and running.

New book explores the lives of Bandon gentry

A new book from historian and genealogist Catherine FitzMaurice – The Sealy, Cornwall and Allin Families of County Cork: Merchants and Bandon Gentry – will be of interest to researchers with ancestral connections to the town of Bandon or to these named families.

These three families arrived in Bandon as English Protestant settlers and are not thought to have arrived in the first influx. Their descendants became influential merchants and made significant contributions to the economic boom of the 1700s and prospered well into the 1800s. They built up significant landholdings as a result of their business activities and, in the early 1800s, through marriages.

Like many prominent Protestant families in County Cork, they were all faced with considerable challenges from the mid-1800s, and this book provides an insight into the life – the highs and the lows – of the gentry in the area throughout this period.

The 234-page book is split into three parts, each concentrating on one of the named families, and appendices follow each section with details of interest to researchers of the particular family.

Published by CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (ISBN-10: 1543295452 / ISBN-13: 978-1543295450), the book can be ordered via Amazon €12.91. All proceeds will be donated to the Allin Institute Restoration project, which seeks to repair and restore a community building bequeathed to the community by James Allin in 1867.

Catherine FitzMaurice has undertaken detailed research into Bandon family history over the past ten years and is the author of Bandon County Cork: A Social History of North Main Street and Kilbrogan Hill and The Tresilian Family of County Cork: Landowners and Bandon Merchants.





Galway Genetic Genealogy Conference, Saturday 5 May

My Heritage rolls out improved DNA Matching service

MyHeritage has announced major updates and improvements to its DNA Matching Service.

Anyone who has taken a MyHeritage DNA test, and anyone who uploaded DNA data from another testing service, will now receive even more accurate DNA Matches; more plentiful matches (about 10 times more); fewer false positives; more specific and more accurate relationship estimates; and indications on lower confidence DNA Matches to help focus research efforts.

Matches are updated daily, and users are notified by a weekly email about the best new matches ie those sharing the largest amount of DNA.

The company also also added an initial release of a long-awaited chromosome browser.

These developments are explained in an in-depth blogpost from MyHeritage.